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Morning Rounds: Falls in older people - KPAX.com | Continuous News | Missoula & Western Montana

Morning Rounds: Falls in older people

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MISSOULA - We answer your medical questions every Wednesday on Montana This Morning during our Morning Rounds segment.

If you have a question that you'd like us to answer, just send us an email at morningrounds@kpax.com.

Dr. Casey Harbine has information about the dangers of falls in older people during the Jan. 17 edition of Morning Rounds.


The National Institute on Aging also offers up some tips for keeping your resolutions, including the following: 

Many things can cause a fall. Your eyesight, hearing, and reflexes might not be as sharp as they were when you were younger. Diabetes, heart disease, or problems with your thyroid, nerves, feet, or blood vessels can affect your balance. Some medicines can cause you to feel dizzy or sleepy, making you more likely to fall. Other causes include safety hazards in the home or community environment.

Scientists have linked several personal risk factors to falling, including muscle weakness, problems with balance and gait, and blood pressure that drops too much when you get up from lying down or sitting (called postural hypotension). Foot problems that cause pain and unsafe footwear, like backless shoes or high heels, can also increase your risk of falling.

Confusion can sometimes lead to falls. For example, if you wake up in an unfamiliar environment, you might feel unsure of where you are. If you feel confused, wait for your mind to clear or until someone comes to help you before trying to get up and walk around.

Some medications can increase a person's risk of falling because they cause side effects like dizziness or confusion. The more medications you take, the more likely you are to fall.?

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