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These states have issued stay-at-home orders to help slow spread of COVID-19

Posted: 1:19 PM, Mar 23, 2020
Updated: 2020-03-31 07:26:27-04
These states have issued stay-at-home orders to help stop spread of COVID-19

A growing number of states are issuing stay-at-home orders to help slow the spread of COVID-19, the illness caused by the new coronavirus that has already killed thousands of people worldwide.

These orders are not necessarily full lockdowns, but they do require residents to stay home except for essential activities, such as grocery shopping, going to the pharmacy, receiving medical care, walking your dog, etc.

If you work in an essential industry, like healthcare, food service or law enforcement, you will also be able to travel to your place of employment.

Many of these orders also prohibit things like visiting other people’s homes (except to provide care or supplies) and gatherings of more than 10 people.

The following states have issued stay-at-home orders:

Arizona

On Match 30, Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey issued a declaration entitled "Stay Home, Stay Healthy, Stay Connected." The order urges Arizonans to limit their time away from home except for "essential activities and functions." It also ordered the closure of businesses deemed "non-essential." The order goes into effect on March 31 at 5 p.m.

For more info on the order, click here.

California

California was the first state to issue one of these orders. On March 19, Gov. Gavin Newsom ordered residents to stay home except as needed “to maintain continuity of operation of the federal critical infrastructure sectors.” The order is in place until further notice.

Click here for answers to some frequently asked questions.

Colorado

On March 25, Colorado Gov. Jared Polis said he was issuing a statewide stay-at-home order, adding that people should only leave their house for essentials, like groceries and medical care. Certain "essential" businesses are exempt from the order.

Click here for FAQs about Colorado's order.

Connecticut

On March 22, Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont urged residents to “stay safe, stay home” as the state continues to combat the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

This came after Lamont issued an executive order on March 20, directing non-essential businesses and nonprofits to reduce their in-person workforce by 100%.

Delaware

The governor of Delaware, John Carney, issued a stay-at-home order on March 22 and ordered any non-essential businesses to close by 8 a.m. on March 24. The measures will remain in effect until May 15 or until the public health threat is eliminated.

“This was not an easy decision, but it’s the right decision to protect the safety of Delawareans and Delaware families,” said Carney. “If you have any questions about whether you should be staying home or going out, stay home. Go to work and go straight back home. If you don’t need food or other essential items, stay home.”

Click here for answers to some frequently asked questions.

District of Columbia

Following guidance from bordering states Maryland and Virginia, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser issued a "stay at home" order on March 30 requiring residents to stay in their homes except to grocery shop, seek medical attentiion or perform "essential" work. The order goes into effect on April 1 at 12:01 a.m. Violation of the order is punishable by a misdemeanor — a fine of up to $5,000 and a jail sentence of up to 90 days in jail.

Hawaii

Gov. David Ige signed a third supplementary proclamation on March 24, ordering the entire state of Hawaii to stay at home and work from home starting March 25, through April 30. Essential workers are exempt.

“The threat of COVID-19 is unprecedented and requires aggressive action,” said Ige. “I have been in discussions with our county mayors who are developing their own plans to meet the unique needs of their counties. We also agree that a statewide order is necessary for cohesion and consistency.”

Idaho

On March 25, Idaho Gov. Brad Little ordered residents to stay at home for the next 21 days amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Little also signed an extreme emergency declaration, which allows the state to more effectively increase health care capacity, take steps to reduce and slow coronavirus spread, and take steps to improve the condition of Idahoans whose job and incomes are being affected by the pandemic.

Click here for answers to some frequently asked questions.

Illinois

On March 20, the governor of Illinois, JB Pritzker, issued an executive order requiring all Illinoisans to stay in their homes to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The order is currently set to last through the end of April 7, but could be extended based on the status of the pandemic.

"We are doing all that we can to maintain as much normalcy as possible while taking the steps we must to protect our residents," said Governor JB Pritzker. "I fully recognize that in some cases I am choosing between saving people's lives and saving their livelihoods. But ultimately, you can't have a livelihood without a life. This will not last forever, but it's what we must do to support the people on the front lines of this fight, and the people most vulnerable to its consequences."

Click here for answers to some frequently asked questions.

Indiana

On March 23, Gov. Eric Holcomb ordered Indiana residents to remain in their homes starting March 24 and lasting until April 6, unless extended.

“The next two weeks are critical if we are to slow the spread of COVID-19, and we must slow the spread. You must be part of the solution, not the problem,” said Holcomb.

Click here for answers to some frequently asked questions.

Kansas

On March 28, Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly issued a stay-at-home order that requires Kansasans to stay in their homes unless obtaining food, medicine or other household necessities; seeking medical care; caring for children, pets, family members or another vulnerable person; or exercising outside.

The order will remain in effect through April 19.

Louisiana

On March 23, Gov. John Bel Edwards issued a statewide “stay at home” order that went into effect immediately. The order is set to expire at the end of the night on April 12, unless extended.

“This order is not something I take lightly, but it is necessary to protect the health, safety and well-being of our people, our communities and our way of life,” said Edwards.

Click here for answers to some frequently asked questions.

Maryland

On March 30, Gov. Larry Hogan signed a "stay at home" order for all residents of Maryland. Only those leaving their home for essential work, grocery shopping, or those leaving their homes for medical care are permitted. Hogan added that Marylanders could leave their home for exercise, provided they follow CDC social distancing guidelines.

Hogan also asked residents not the leave the state, and asked those that do self-quarantine for 14 days.

Violators of the order could face up to a year in prison and/or a $5,000 fine.

Click here to read the order.

Massachusetts

On March 23, the governor of Massachusetts, Charlie Baker, directed the state’s public health department to issue a stay at home advisory, urging residents to stay indoors and avoid unnecessary travel for a two week period.

Baker also issued an emergency order requiring all businesses and organizations that don’t provide “COVID-19 Essential Services” to close their physical workplaces and facilities to workers, customers and the public as of March 24 until Tuesday, April 7.

Click here for answers to some frequently asked questions.

Michigan

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer signed a “stay home, stay safe” executive order on March 23, directing all Michigan businesses and operations to temporarily suspend in-person operations that at are not necessary to sustain or protect life.

The order also directs Michiganders to stay in their homes unless they’re a part of that critical infrastructure workforce, engaged in an outdoor activity, or performing tasks necessary to the health and safety of themselves or their family, like going to the hospital or grocery store.

The order will be in effect for at least three weeks.

Click here for answers to some frequently asked questions.

Minnesota

On March 25, Gov. Tim Walz signed an executive order directing Minnesotans to stay at home and limit movements outside of their home beyond essential needs. It takes effect at 11:59 p.m. on March 27 and is set to end at 5 p.m. on April 10, unless extended.

“We must take bold action to save the lives of Minnesotans,” said Governor Walz. “Having served as a Command Sergeant Major in the Army National Guard, I know the importance of having a plan. While the virus will still be here when this order ends, this action will slow the spread of COVID-19 and give Minnesota time to ready for battle.”

Click here for answers to some frequently asked questions.

Montana

Gov. Steve Bullock issued an executive order on March 26 directing all residents of Montana to stay at home to the greatest extent possible. The order also says all businesses and operations in the state, except those deemed essential, are required to cease all activities.

These restrictions will be effective in the state from March 28 to April 10, unless extended.

New Hampshire

On March 26, the governor of New Hampshire, Chris Sununu, announced that the state would be issuing stay-at-home order and directing all non-essential businesses to end in-person and public-interacting operations by 11:59 p.m. on March 27.

“This is not a shelter in place,” wrote Sununu in a series of tweets. “No one will be prevented from leaving their home & the state is not closing its borders. In taking these actions, we are aligning with our regional partners.”

Click here for answers to some frequently asked questions.

New Jersey

New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy signed an executive order on March 21, directing residents of the state to stay at home until further notice.

“From day one, we’ve made a commitment to be guided by the facts and take any action necessary to protect the health and safety of New Jersey’s nine million residents,” said Murphy. “We know the virus spreads through person-to person contact, and the best way to prevent further exposure is to limit our public interactions to only the most essential purposes. This is a time for us all to come together in one mission to ‘flatten the curve’ and slow – and eventually halt – the spread of coronavirus.”

Click here for answers to some frequently asked questions.

New Mexico

On March 23, New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham instructed residents to remain in their homes or places of residence except for outings absolutely necessary for health, safety and welfare.

The state’s secretary of health, Kathy Kunkel, also issued an order closing all non-essential businesses, requiring 100 percent of the state’s non-essential workforce to work from home.

Click here for answers to some frequently asked questions.

New York

In New York, one of the states hit hardest by the virus, 100% of the workforce must stay home, excluding essential services.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo has signed an executive order called, “New York state on PAUSE,” which includes a directive that all non-essential businesses had to close in-office personnel functions by March 22.

Click here for answers to some frequently asked questions.

North Carolina

On March 27, North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper issued a "stay-at-home" order that goes in effect March 30 at 5 p.m.

The order lasts 30 days and expires on April 29. It bans gatherings of more than 10 people but does allow exemptions for essential travel and exercise.

Click here to read the entire order.

Ohio

On March 22, Gov. Mike DeWine ordered Ohio residents to stay in their homes, beginning March 23 until April 6, unless the order is extended.

"We haven't faced an enemy like we are facing today in 102 years - we are at war. In the time of war, we must make sacrifices, and I thank all of our Ohio citizens for what they are doing and what they aren't doing. You are making a huge difference, and this difference will save lives," said Governor DeWine.

Click here for answers to some frequently asked questions.

Oregon

Oregon Governor Kate Brown issued an executive order on March 23, directing residents to say home to the maximum extent possible. It also prohibits non-essential social and recreational gatherings, regardless of size. Additionally, it closes businesses where close personal contact is difficult to avoid, like hair salons and gyms.

“Today, I am issuing a new executive order further requiring social distancing measures because we know this is the most effective way to flatten the curve and slow the spread of this virus. I hope everyone in Oregon abides by its core message: stay home unless absolutely necessary.

Brown says failing to comply with the order will be considered an immediate danger to public health and be subject to a class C misdemeanor.

Click here for answers to some frequently asked questions.

Tennessee

On March 30, Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee issued a "Safer At Home" order for his state. While the order is not a shelter-in-place mandate, it asks Tennesseans to stay at home when possible.

The order goes into effect at 11:59 p.m. on March 31.

For a full list of activities and businesses deemed "essential," click here.

Vermont

On March 24, Gov. Phil Scott today issued a “stay home, stay safe” order and directed the closure of in-person operations for all non-essential businesses.

“I want to be very clear about this: We need everyone to limit activities outside of the home and to practice social distancing at all times to slow the spread of this highly contagious and potentially deadly virus,” said Scott. “We all must do our part to slow the spread of COVID-19 to minimize infections - particularly for those who are elderly or have underlying chronic health conditions - and prevent it from overwhelming our healthcare facilities. The more Vermonters who take this seriously and stay home, the faster we can return to normal.”

Virginia

On March 30, Gov. Ralph Northam issued a "stay-at-home" order. According to the governor's order, people should only leave their homes for certain essential activities, like grocery shopping or medical treatment.

West Virginia

Gov. Jim Justice issued a “stay at home" order on March 23, directing all West Virginia residents to stay at home and limit movements outside of their homes beyond essential needs.

“This disease is really serious stuff. Please stay home, please listen to our order, and please in every way shape, form, or fashion keep consulting your God above and absolutely every one of us will get through this,” said Justice.

Click here for answers to some frequently asked questions.

Washington

On March 23, Gov. Jay Inslee signed a statewide “stay home, stay healthy “ order requiring all residents to stay home. He said the order would last for two weeks and could be extended.

The order also closes all non-essential businesses and bans all gatherings for social, spiritual and recreational purposes.

“The less time we spend in public, the more lives we will save,” Inslee said.

Click here for answers to some frequently asked questions.

Wisconsin

Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers announced on March 23 that he would be issued a “safer at home” order on March 24. He also said residents need to limit their interactions to friends and neighbors.

“Shrinking your circle of interactions will help prevent the spread of COVID-19,” wrote Evers in a string of tweets. “Unfortunately, that means no sleepovers, no play dates, and no dinner parties with friends and neighbors.”